Luke Harte joins Trisent as COO

Luke Harte joins Trisent as COO

We are very pleased to announce that Luke Harte has joined Trisent as Chief Operations Officer.

Here are a few of the press clippings and also the full press release text is below:

Full Press Release

SCOTTISH tech start-up, Trisent, which has been developing a product to help people protect and control their personal data, has appointed Luke Harte as its chief operations officer.

He previously founded and ran technology start-up Onyu, which focused on personal information security. Use of personal data by global companies is now top of the news agenda but Trisent and Onyu have been working on protection of personal data for some time.

Luke said: “The way our information has been held has always been vulnerable and never controlled by the owner. This is only starting to become common knowledge via social media issues and, of course, GDPR.

“Trisent’s ‘Dropbox’ for personal data allows the user to consolidate and take control of their personal information. There is clearly a growing need for this, but what I really like about Trisent’s approach is that they have put user trust and security at the core of their product.”

Luke started Onyu with co-founder Stuart Beattie in 2013 and created an app allowing individuals to securely store and share personal information with their contacts.

Gordon Povey, Trisent, founder and CEO, said: “I have known Luke for a number of years, initially through his work at Onyu, and he has also worked with us on a couple of projects.

“He has a great technology and entrepreneurial background, shares in our values around data privacy, he also understands our technology and the market challenges. So, to have him join our team is brilliant news and will add strength to the company.”

Ends

Prof Bill Buchanan talks about data and trust

Prof Bill Buchanan talks about data and trust

Professor William (Bill) Buchanan OBE FBCS CEng FIET is a Scottish computer scientist and world authority on cybersecurity. He currently leads the Centre for Distributed Computing and Security at Edinburgh Napier University and The Cyber Academy.

We are very fortunate to have Bill on the the Trisent Advisory Board. In this short video he talks about how GDPR will force changes on the internet and in particular in regards to personal data, ownership, trust, citizen rights and anonymity, with cyptography and blockchain technology coming to the forefront of the ‘new’ internet.

Scotland Means Business: Trisent

Scotland Means Business: Trisent

Scotland Means Business: Trisent

Business feature by Emer O’Toole in today’s National newspaper.

THE recent allegations that Cambridge Analytica harvested Facebook users’ information has made people more aware of the power and misuse of data. This is something Gordon Povey has been concerned about for years. His business, Trisent, aims to make data useful to the individual by putting it in one place and encrypting it.

“Disruptive Companies like ours will change the old data model.”

Read the complete news story here.

Kylie Minogue and the Shed

Kylie Minogue and the Shed

What has the diminutive Aussie pop star got to do with a garden outbuilding? The answer to that question is most probably nothing. So why is this blog post titled Kylie Minogue and the Shed? The answer to this second question is that in the ‘land of Internet’ they can easily become bedfellows.

When you search for content on the Internet the first thing that normally happens is that your search results are ranked with advertising and sponsored content related to your keywords at the top (annoying, but the advertisers are the paying customers, so their content comes first). So, if you search for Kylie Minogue you will most probably be presented with an advert for Kylie concert tickets as the top result (go on try it!).

Anyway, you scroll down until you find a link to potentially interesting content and you follow this. You are now away from the search engine, the ranked results and sponsored links, the adverts start to look different. They usually do not relate to the content on the page, they relate to what the advertising platform knows about you (or thinks they know about you) and in many cases bears absolutely no relation to the content of interest. So, having found an article about Kylie I find that half of the screen is taken up with adverts for, well, sheds for example.

Lorem ipsum KylieThis is a true shed related experience that I had recently. I was doing a bit of research for a new shed for my mother’s garden. In particular, I wanted to find the best way to build a base for the shed, and was also trying to find the best type of shed. My research was probably spread over about a week and then I bought the shed for my mum’s garden and put sheds out of my mind.

Then days later while browsing on the internet (I am simply using the example of Kylie). Every time I find online content of interest (e.g. Kylie Minogue) about 50% of the page is taken up with sponsored content related somehow to sheds. The intelligent algorithms, and all the clever Artificial Intelligence we are told is targeting ads with pinpoint accuracy, and it obviously has me classified as a ‘shed geek’. These advertising systems are so smart that they just know I simply cannot resist a shed, and will be distracted away from Kylie in order to buy another 10. I am after all the ‘shed geek’!

Admittedly, after 3 months or so, the latest online machine learning technology has caught up with me and figured – ‘Okay this guy must have kicked his shed habit, and was looking at blockchain technology so he will absolutely love a Bitcoin scam or two – so hit him with it!”.

Is it just me that thinks online advertising is basically a digital version of roadside billboards – sitting there in the hope that one in a thousand or so might be vaguely interested? It is still just an eyes and numbers game. I think personalisation and customisation could do so much for us. We just need to stop doing it the old stupid and inefficient way. More on this later!

Personal Data for Personal Benefit

Personal Data for Personal Benefit

One upon a time Alice could go straight to the library to search and browse. Now she must go through the shopping mall before she can get to the library. Does this sound familiar?